The 2020 Kansas City Writing Workshop: March 28, 2020

screen-shot-2015-05-28-at-9-16-34-am.pngAfter successful one-day conferences in 2017 and 2019, Writing Day Workshops is excited to announce The 2020 Kansas City Writing Workshop — a full-day “How to Get Published” online writers conference on March 28, 2020.

This writing event is a wonderful opportunity to get intense instruction over the course of one day, pitch a literary agent or editor (optional), get your questions answered, and more. All questions about the event regarding schedule, details and registration are answered below. Thank you for your interest in the 2020 Kansas City Writing Workshop!

(If you already know you want to register for the 2020 KC event, you can do so immediately at this link: http://bit.ly/KansasCityRegistrationForm)

(IMPORTANT MARCH 2020 UPDATE: The 2020 KCWW is now an Online Conference to keep everyone safe. There is much more to say about this, but immediately you should understand 1) This will be easy and awesome, 2) You do not have to be tech-savvy to do this, and 3) We are keeping all aspects of the event, including one-on-one agent & editor pitching, which will now be done by Skype or phone. Learn all details about the new March 28 KCWW Online Conference here and what everything means.)

* * * * *

WHAT IS IT?

This is a special one-day “How to Get Published” online writers conference (find out what that means) on Saturday, March 28, 2020, at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Kansas City Plaza. In other words, it’s one day full of classes and advice designed to give you the best instruction concerning how to get your writing & books published. We’ll discuss your publishing opportunities today, how to write queries & pitches, how to market yourself and your books, what makes an agent/editor stop reading your manuscript, and more. No matter what you’re writing — fiction or nonfiction — the day’s classes will help point you in the right direction. Writers of all genres are welcome.

This event is designed to squeeze as much into one day of learning as possible. You can ask any questions you like during the classes, and get your specific concerns addressed. We will have literary agents onsite to give feedback and take pitches from writers, as well. This year’s faculty so far includes:

  • editor Andrea Hall (Albert Whitman & Company)
  • literary agent Heather Cashman (Storm Literary)
  • literary agent Elizabeth Copps (Maria Carvainis Literary)
  • literary agent Jori Hanna (CYLE Literary)
  • literary agent Reiko Davis (Defiore & Company)
  • literary agent Kortney Price (Raven Quill Literary)
  • literary agent Stephanie Hansen (Metamorphosis Literary Agency)
  • literary agent Jessica Schmeidler (Golden Wheat Literary)
  • and possibly more agents to come.

By the end of the day, you will have all the tools you need to move forward on your writing journey. This independent event is organized by coordinator Kerrie Flanagan of Writing Day Workshops, with assistance from the Kansas & Missouri Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators (SCBWI).

EVENT LOCATION & DETAILS

9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., Saturday, March 28, 2020, at the Embassy Suites by Hilton Kansas City Plaza, 220 W 43rd St, Kansas City, MO 64111, (816) 756-1720.

(Update: The event is now an online conference to keep everyone safe. Find out how an online event works here.)

Screen Shot 2019-11-14 at 4.30.27 PM

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE (MARCH 28, 2020)

9 – 9:30: Check-in and registration at the event location.

9:30 – 10:30: “Elevator, Twitter, or Query Letter? — How to Pitch and Get Noticed,” taught by Heather Cashman. Selling your story to an agent or editor requires grabbing their attention in a matter of seconds. Learn how to write strong pitches and queries that will grab a reader’s attention and get them wanting more. This session will not only address more conventional query letter pitches, but also how to utilize pitchfests on Twitter to gain agent attention.

10:30 – 11:45: “Breaking Out of Writer’s Block: Tips, Tricks, and Trades to Jumpstart Your Writing,” taught by Leatrice McKinney. Stuck on a scene? On a chapter? On an entire first act? Come learn a few ways to get out of a slump and get back on track with putting words to paper. This session, taught by a published author, will provide practices that have helped her and others meet deadlines and word count goals with (relative) ease.

11:45 – 1:15: Lunch on your own. There are several restaurants within quick driving/walking distance.

Screen shot 2014-10-02 at 10.30.04 PM1:15 – 2:30: “Writers’ Got Talent: A Page One Critique-Fest.” In the vein of American Idol or America’s Got Talent, this is a chance to get your first page read (anonymously — no bylines given) with attending agents commenting on what was liked or not liked about the submission. Get expert feedback on your incredibly important first page, and know if your writing has what it needs to keep readers’ attention. (All attendees are welcome to bring pages to the event for this session, and we will choose pages at random for the workshop for as long as time lasts.)

2:50 – 3:50: “5 Ways to Build Your Author Platform,” taught by Kerrie Flanagan. Whether you’re writing novels or are trying to position yourself as an expert for your nonfiction books, a strong author platform allows you to reach a large audience. The challenge for many writers is they feel overwhelmed and don’t know how to begin constructing that platform. This workshop alleviates that stress by sharing five different ways to build an effective author platform, allowing you to choose the routes that best match your personality and experiences.

4:00 – 5:00: “Working With an Agent,” taught by Kortney Price. This session, taught by a literary agent, explains how to best work with a literary agent once you have found representation. Have do you deal with long wait times when your work is on submission? How to communicate effectively with an agent when you’re not on the same page? What happens when you want to write in a different genre, but the agent doesn’t rep that category? These questions, and more, will be addressed.

All throughout the day: Agent & Editor Pitching.

PITCH AN AGENT!

Screen Shot 2018-11-13 at 2.29.57 PM.pngHeather Cashman is a literary agent with Storm Literary. She is currently seeking middle grade and young adult novels, especially if the story has a high concept and excellent voice. She’ll also take adult pitches at conferences and loves a good hook with complex plots and twists that she didn’t see coming. For adult, I’d prefer not to get memoir, chick lit, or inspirational. I tend to prefer speculative and genre fiction but also get captivated by the occasional contemporary or romance.” Learn more about Heather and her bio here.

Screen Shot 2019-11-25 at 11.40.49 AMAndrea Hall is an Editor at Albert Whitman & Co. She is particularly drawn to stories that have layers of meaning and diversity. For picture books, she seeks fiction and nonfiction: nature, STEM, multiculturalism, folktales, historical, biographies, special needs topics, #ownvoices. For chapter books and middle grade and young adult, she seeks contemporary, contemporary fantasy, magical realism, mystery, and historical fiction. Learn more about Andrea here.

Screen Shot 2019-10-29 at 8.38.10 AMReiko Davis [SOLD OUT OF PITCH APPOINTMENTS] is a literary agent with DeFiore & Co. Reiko’s interests are varied, but she is particularly drawn to adult literary and upmarket/mainstream fiction, narrative nonfiction, and young adult and middle grade fiction. Above all, she wants to discover books that surprise and move her with their irresistible characters and language. She loves a strong narrative voice; smart, funny heroines; narrowly located settings (especially towns in the South and Midwest); family sagas; darkly suspenseful novels; and stories of remarkable friendships or that explore the often perilous terrain of human relationships. For children’s books, she is actively looking for young adult and middle grade fiction—whether it be contemporary, historical, fantasy, or simply a story with a timeless quality and vibrant characters. For nonfiction, she is most interested in cultural, social, and literary history; fascinating tours through niche subjects; narrative science; psychology; guides on creativity; and memoir. Learn more about Reiko here.

Screen Shot 2019-01-16 at 12.53.16 PM.pngElizabeth Copps [SOLD OUT OF PITCH APPOINTMENTS] is a literary agent with Maria Carvainis Agency, Inc. “I represent a wide range of genres from middle grade and young adult, to adult contemporary + literary fiction, mystery, psychological thriller, women’s fiction, historical fiction, horror, and select nonfiction projects. I’m an equal fan of hilarious stories as well as dark, gritty and sinister reads.” Learn more about Elizabeth here.

Screen Shot 2019-11-14 at 11.47.38 PMKortney Price is a literary agent with Raven Quill Literary. Kortney specializes in books for children from picture books through young adult. Her belief in these stories’ ability to change lives and the world drives her to always look for a way to introduce young readers to new people, cultures, and adventures much like her favorite childhood stories did for her. Whether a story changes the reader’s world view, tells them they aren’t alone or just offers an escape, every book in this field has the potential to make a difference in a child’s life and Kortney is honored to play a part in getting those stories into the hands of readers. Learn more about Kortney here.

Screen Shot 2019-11-16 at 6.36.24 PMJori Hanna is a literary scout for CYLE Literary Elite.  As a literary agent, Jori personally seeks/represents suspense novels of any kind. But she is also acting as a literary scout for all of CYLE Literary Elite’s agents. That means she is happy to take pitches for picture books, board books, chapter books, middle grade (any kind), young adult (any kind), science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, romance, historical, women’s, Christian fiction, literary fiction, and mainstream fiction. In nonfiction, her agency seeks devotionals, self-help, inspirational, and parenting. Learn more about Jori here.

Screen Shot 2019-11-16 at 1.15.07 PMJessica Schmeidler is a literary agent with Golden Wheat Literary. She is seeking: general/mainstream fiction, mystery, romance, suspense/thriller, fantasy, science fiction, young adult and middle grade, religious nonfiction, children’s picture books, and Christian fiction. Golden Wheat Literary was founded in an effort to help connect Christian writers with the vast market of both Christian and secular publishers. To that end, the manuscripts that are accepted do not need to be overtly Christian, but must exist within the realities of Christian faith. If your manuscript’s elements can all be true without any part of God’s Word needing to step aside or be discounted, it is acceptable for submission/pitch. Learn more about Jessica here.

Screen Shot 2016-11-28 at 11.54.49 PM.pngStephanie Hansen is a literary agent with Metamorphosis Literary Agency. She represents predominately young adult science fiction & fantasy but has a secret addiction for adult thrillers. While these are her favorite, she also handles children’s picture books, middle grade, young adult science fiction & fantasy (diversity = a plus), adult literary fiction, and women’s fiction. She is actively building her client list. Learn more about Stephanie here.

 

More 2020 agents/editors may be added in the coming weeks.

These one-on-one meetings are an amazing chance to pitch your book face-to-face with an agent, and get personal, individual feedback on your pitch/concept. If the agent likes your pitch, they’ll request to see part/all of your book — sending you straight past the slush pile. It also gives you an intimate chance to meet with an agent and pick their brain with any questions on your mind.

(Please note that Agent/Editor Pitching is an add-on, separate aspect of the day, for only those who sign up. Spaces are limited for these premium meetings, and pricing/detail is explained below.)

PRICING

$169 — EARLY BIRD base price for registration to the 2020 KCWW and access to all workshops, all day, on March 28, 2020. As of October 2019, event registration is now OPEN.

Add $29 — to secure a 10-minute one-on-one meeting with any of our literary agents in attendance. Use this special meeting as a chance to pitch your work and get professional feedback on your pitch. (Spaces limited.) If they wish, attendees are free to sign up for multiple 10-minute pitch sessions at $29/session — pitching multiple individuals. There is no limit. Here are quick testimonials regarding writers who have signed with literary agents after pitching them at prior Writing Day Workshops events. (Our bigger, growing list of success stories can be seen here.)

Screen Shot 2018-11-26 at 11.11.29 AM.png“I met my client, Alison Hammer, at the Writing
Workshop of Chicago and just sold her book.”
– literary agent Joanna Mackenzie of Nelson Literary

Screen Shot 2017-05-02 at 11.47.54 PM.png“Good news! I signed a client [novelist Aliza Mann]
from the Michigan Writing Workshop!”
– literary agent Sara Mebigow of KT Literary

Screen Shot 2018-11-05 at 12.56.10 PM“I signed author Stephanie Wright from
the Seattle Writing Workshop.”
– literary agent Kathleen Ortiz of New Leaf Literary

Screen Shot 2018-05-17 at 9.07.44 PM“I signed an author [Kate Thompson] that I
met at the Philadelphia Writing Workshop.”
– literary agent Kimberly Brower of Brower Literary

Screen Shot 2016-10-16 at 2.54.50 PM.png“I signed novelist Kathleen McInnis after meeting her
at the Chesapeake Writing Workshop.”

– literary agent Adriann Ranta of Foundry Literary + Media

Add $69 — for an in-depth, personal critique of your one-page query letter from Chuck Sambuchino, a former editor for Writer’s Digest Books and the Guide to Literary Agents. Registrants are encouraged to take advantage of the specially-priced critique, so they can send out their query letter with confidence following the workshop. Also, if you are meeting with an agent at the event, you’re essentially speaking your query letter aloud to them. Wouldn’t it be wise to give that query letter (i.e., your pitch) one great edit before that meeting?

Add $89 — for an in-depth personal critique of the first 10 pages of your novel. Spaces with faculty for these critiques are very limited, and participating attendees get an in-person meeting at the workshop. Options:

  • Mystery, women’s fiction, and romance (contemporary, rom-com, paranormal, YA): Faculty member Denise Grover Swank, a published writer, will get your work in advance, critique the first 10 double-spaced pages of your story, meet with you for at least 10 minutes at the workshop to discuss her thoughts, and pass along written critique notes at the meeting. If you submit romance to her, please note her accepted subgenres above; no Western, erotica, inspirational, or historical, please.
  • Science fiction and fantasy (both adult, and YA): Faculty member Leatrice McKinney (pen name L.L. McKinney), a published writer, will get your work in advance, critique the first 10 double-spaced pages of your story, meet with you for at least 10 minutes at the workshop to discuss her thoughts, and pass along written critique notes at the meeting. L.L. is happy to critique either YA or adult SF/F, and she prefers urban fantasy or contemporary fantasy.
  • Thriller, literary fiction, mainstream fiction, historical fiction, short stories, middle grade (all kinds), picture books, contemporary YA (no SF/F): Faculty member Eve Porinchak, a former literary agent and current writing coach, will get your work in advance, critique the first 10 double-spaced pages of your manuscript, and provide a critique. Picture books should be 1,000 words or fewer, and can or cannot include illustrations. Unlike other critiquers helping our KC 2020 workshop, Eve will not personally be at the event. That means you will get your notes emailed from her, and she can talk with you via Skype or phone in place of an in-person consultation.
  • More critique options possibly forthcoming.

How to pay/register — Registration is now open for 2020.

(Please note that the event is now a one-day Online Conference. Click here to learn all about how this will work. We are still taking registrations all the way through March 27.)

To register by Google Forms, click on the link below to fill out the form. Once you submit the form and let us know everything you want at the conference, you will get instructions on how to pay by PayPal or check.

http://bit.ly/KansasCityRegistrationForm

Once the Google form is complete and payment is made (either check or PayPal), you will have reserved a seat at the event.

If you have any issues with the Google form, or would simply rather talk with someone via email, just reach out to workshop organizer Kerrie Flanagan via email: WDWfaculty@gmail.com. She can pass along registration information to you, and give instructions on how to pay by PayPal or check. Once payment is complete, you will have a reserved seat at the event. The Kansas City Writing Workshop will send out periodic e-mail updates to all registered attendees with any & all news about the event. Because Kerrie plans different workshops, if you email her, make sure you note that you’re inquiring about the Kansas City workshop specifically.

REGISTRATION

Because of limited space at the venue of the Embassy Suites by Hilton Kansas City Plaza, the workshop can only allow 150 registrants, unless spacing issues change. For this reason, we encourage you to book sooner rather than later. (Just a reminder that the event has moved Online as of March 2020.)

Are spaces still available? Yes, we still have spaces available. We will announce RIGHT HERE, at this point on this web page, when all spaces are taken. If you do not see a note right here saying how all spaces are booked, then yes, we still have room, and you are encouraged to register.

How to Register: Registration is now open for 2020.

To register by Google Forms, click on the link below to fill out the form. Once you submit the form and let us know everything you want at the conference, you will get instructions on how to pay by PayPal or check.

http://bit.ly/KansasCityRegistrationForm

Once the Google form is complete and payment is made (either check or PayPal), you will have reserved a seat at the event.

If you have any issues with the Google form, or would simply rather talk with someone via email, just reach out to workshop organizer Kerrie Flanagan via email: WDWfaculty@gmail.com. She can pass along registration information to you, and give instructions on how to pay by PayPal or check. Once payment is complete, you will have a reserved seat at the event. The Kansas City Writing Workshop will send out periodic e-mail updates to all registered attendees with any & all news about the event. Because Kerrie plans different workshops, if you email her, make sure you note that you’re inquiring about the Kansas City workshop specifically.

Refunds: If you sign up for the event and have to cancel for any reason, you will receive 50% of your total payment back [sent by check or PayPal]. The other 50% is nonrefundable and will not be returned, and helps the workshop ensure that only those truly interested in the limited spacing sign up for the event. (Please note that query editing payments are completely non-refundable if the instructor has already edited your letter.)

Screen Shot 2016-11-16 at 10.43.05 AM.png

Thank you for your interest in the 2020 Kansas City Writing Workshop.

 

 

 

The 2020 KCWW is Now an Online Conference — Here’s What to Know

Hi Kansas City Writing Workshop attendees,                  

Coordinator Kerrie Flanagan here with the Kansas City Writing Workshop on March 28, 2020.

I hope you are staying safe and healthy. I wanted to update on you on our plans for the 2020 KCWW. We are excited to announce that we are moving the event to an all-day Live Online Conference on March 28, 2020. There will be no in-person event this year.

We will spell out details below in terms of what that means, but the important and immediate things to know are 

1) this will be great and easy

2) this will not eliminate any aspect of the event. 

We will still have great classes teaching you how to get published, one-on-one video/phone pitches with agents, and helpful critiques. In fact, moving the event to a teleconference on the computer not only will keep attendees & faculty 100% safe, but it also adds some new awesome elements that we’re excited about. More on that below.

We understand that an Online Conference may be new to some attendees, but do not worry. It is quite easy to do, and we will have detailed steps on what to do and when. Essentially, all you need is access to a working computer, tablet, or phone with Internet, and then you watch the conference on your screen live. You’ll click links in emails and be able to watch live classes and ask questions. That’s it. Also, the day’s classes can be viewed again and again because it’s all recorded! Many writing conferences are switching to teleconferences during these months, and it’s going well. Lastly, we the KCWW coordinators are available all day long before and during March 28 to help and assist. You can always call on us. Write me at wdwfaculty@gmail.com.

OUR NEW ONLINE CONFERENCE – WHAT TO UNDERSTAND FOR ATTENDEES

What do attendees have to do right now: Nothing right now. All is well. Just read through this email whenever you like so you understand how the day will work. That’s it. We will continue to stay in touch all the way through March 28 with updates. As always, we are happy to answer any questions.

Are we still accepting new attendees for the online events? Yes. Thank you for any word-spreading you do. People who want to register can contact me (Kerrie) at wdwfaculty@gmail.com

Timing of the day: We are still having the event on Saturday, March 28, from 9:30-5:00. The classes will be online live during that time for you to watch. Concerning your one-on-one meetings with agents & editors, you will have personal Skype or phone conversations for your agent pitches and critiques. Many of those may happen on March 28, or some in the days before/after the event.

How classes work: We send you an email, and on the morning of March 28, you open the email, click on a link, and log in to our “Classroom.” At that point, you are IN the conference with all other attendees—watching the classes on your screen. Then faculty members will be able to teach over the computer and speak directly to you. There is a Chat Box where you can type your questions at any time. For the KCWW, our policy is that no question goes unanswered. That means if you type in a question and the presenter runs out of time to address all questions, those questions get answered following the event and emailed out to everyone.

Classes are recorded (and this is amazing news)! With an in-person conference, attendees would miss snippets of classes because they leave the classroom to pitch, or make a phone call, or anything else. But the 5 classes happening during March 28 are all recorded, which means we will send the whole day’s recording following the event. You can watch it as many times as you want during the next three months. This is an exciting new element that we couldn’t include before. Also, we will be sending out all handouts for all classes to attendees in advance. Lastly, having this new technology allows us WDW faculty members to pre-record sessions, too—meaning we will actually send attendees extra FREE classes as part of their attendance. In addition to getting the day’s 5 classes sent to you to watch over and over again, we will also send you extra classes, including:

  • 15 Tips on How to Write Like the Pros—a class on craft and voice, by Brian Klems
  • How to Write a Nonfiction Book Proposal—a class on selling nonfiction, by Brian Klems
  • 10 Query Letter Tips—a class to help your submission chances, by Chuck Sambuchino
  • An Overview of Your Publishing Options Today—a class on understanding the difference between self-publishing and traditional publishing, by Chuck Sambuchino
  • Improve Your Writing: The Basics of Self-Editing and Revision, by Kerrie Flanagan

How agent & editor pitches work: Agents and editors are blocking off their whole day on March 28 to take pitches via Skype (or a comparable video software) from attendees. So you will still get your individual 10-minute one-on-one pitches with agents and editors. If you’re not familiar with Skype, you can always do the pitches by phone—you can choose.

Query critiques: Those will be done before the event and emailed out to you. Nothing is changed. This is an add-on feature for people who opted for a query critique.

Manuscript critiques: This is also an add-on element. If you paid for a manuscript critique, your critique faculty member should be in touch with you directly with their notes, and to schedule a 10-minute phone call (or Skype call). Thanks.

First Pages Panel: The panel is still happening. We will collect your first pages in advance over email and pick them at random for the agents to critique during this midday centerpiece panel. Having this panel taped (so you can rewatch it) is an exciting opportunity!

Other notes: We considered rescheduling, but since there is no end date to the problem, it doesn’t work. We are excited about the online conference on March 28, and hope to have the conference as a live event again in 2021 and beyond.

Thanks for your patience and we get ready for this fantastic online event. As you can imagine, there is a lot of pieces to put in place. I am here to answer your questions, and will respond to them as soon as I can. Watch for more updates coming soon. 

I look forward to “seeing” you all on the 28th. Stay safe and have a wonderful day. 

Thanks
Kerrie Flanagan, coordinator
wdwfaculty@gmail.com
https://kansaswritingworkshop.com/

 

Get to Know an Agent in Attendance: Reiko Davis of DeFiore & Company

Screen Shot 2016-11-29 at 3.25.12 PM.png[SOLD OUT OF PITCH APPOINTMENTS]

Reiko Davis is a literary agent with DeFiore & Co. in New York City.

Previously, she was an associate agent at Miriam Altshuler Literary Agency for four years. She grew up in Kansas City, received her BA in Comparative Literature and Art History from Brown University, and is a graduate of the Columbia Publishing Course.

Reiko’s interests are varied, but she is particularly drawn to adult literary and upmarket/mainstream fiction, narrative nonfiction, and young adult and middle grade fiction. Above all, she wants to discover books that surprise and move her with their irresistible characters and language.

She loves a strong narrative voice; smart, funny heroines; narrowly located settings (especially towns in the South and Midwest); family sagas; darkly suspenseful novels; and stories of remarkable friendships or that explore the often perilous terrain of human relationships.

For children’s books, she is actively looking for young adult and middle grade fiction—whether it be contemporary, historical, fantasy, or simply a story with a timeless quality and vibrant characters.

For nonfiction, she is most interested in cultural, social, and literary history; fascinating tours through niche subjects; narrative science; psychology; guides on creativity; and memoir.

Get to Know an Agent in Attendance: Heather Cashman of Storm Literary

Screen Shot 2018-11-13 at 2.29.54 PM.pngHeather Cashman is a literary agent with Storm Literary.

At the 2020 KC workshop, Heather is taking pitches, and also teaching a class.

She is currently seeking middle grade or young adult, especially if it has a high concept and excellent voice. She’ll also take adult pitches at conferences and loves a good hook with complex plots and twists that she didn’t see coming. For adult I’d prefer not to get memoir, chick lit, or inspirational. I tend to prefer speculative and genre fiction but also get captivated by the occasional contemporary or romance.”

After working as a professional editor for Cornerstones Literary US/UK and managing Pitch Wars and #PitMad, Heather used to assist Stacy Cantor-Abrams at Entangled Publishing. Because of her diverse background working for agents, editors, published authors, and mentoring, Heather also freelance edits. In her free time, she loves road trips, kayaking, hiking, and of course, writing novels–always with a speculative element from her days working as a biochemist.

Get to Know an Agent in Attendance: Jessica Schmeidler of Golden Wheat Literary

Screen Shot 2018-11-13 at 1.51.09 PM.pngJessica Schmeidler is a literary agent with Golden Wheat Literary.

She is seeking: general/mainstream fiction, mystery, romance, suspense/thriller, fantasy, science fiction, young adult and middle grade, religious nonfiction, children’s picture books, and Christian fiction.

Golden Wheat Literary was founded in an effort to help connect Christian writers with the vast market of both Christian and secular publishers. To that end, the manuscripts that are accepted do not need to be overtly Christian, but must exist within the realities of Christian faith. If your manuscript’s elements can all be true without any part of God’s Word needing to step aside or be discounted, it is acceptable for submission/pitch.

Get to Know an Editor in Attendance: Andrea Hall is an Editor at Albert Whitman & Company

Screen Shot 2019-11-25 at 11.40.49 AMAndrea Hall is an Editor at Albert Whitman & Company.

She is particularly drawn to stories that have layers of meaning and diversity. Some of the titles she’s acquired include Chester Nez and the Unbreakable CodeShubh Diwali!, and Far Apart, Close in Heart. Andrea started her publishing career at Pearson Education and is a former ARA of the Central and Southern Ohio Chapter of SCBWI.

For picture books, she seeks fiction and nonfiction: nature, STEM, multiculturalism, folktales, historical, biographies, special needs topics, #ownvoices.

For chapter books and middle grade and young adult, she seeks contemporary, contemporary fantasy, magical realism, mystery, and historical fiction.

 

 

Get to Know an Agent in Attendance: Elizabeth Copps of Maria Carvainis Agency, Inc.

Screen Shot 2019-01-16 at 12.53.16 PM.png[SOLD OUT OF PITCH APPOINTMENTS]

Elizabeth Copps is a literary agent with Maria Carvainis Agency, Inc.

“I migrated from Florida to start my career with Maria Carvainis Agency as an intern in 2010. In 2011 I signed on with the agency as a full-time assistant, and two years later I moved to Associate Agent.

“I represent a wide range of genres from middle grade and young adult, to adult contemporary + literary fiction, mystery, psychological thriller, women’s fiction, historical fiction, horror, and select nonfiction projects. I’m an equal fan of hilarious stories as well as dark, gritty and sinister reads.”

“For me, the very best books are timeless, thought provoking, and discussion spurring. I want to see characters who burst off the page and elicit some sort of emotional response in their readers. There are only so many settings and themes to expound on, but every single person is different which means there are limitless combinations of character traits a writer can play with. That’s pretty amazing. The King said it best regarding what it means to create a complex character: “Bad writing usually arises from a stubborn refusal to tell stories about what people actually do―to face the fact, let us say, that murderers sometimes help old ladies cross the street.”